KNEE REPLACEMENT IN MERIDIAN, ID

KNEE REPLACEMENT IN MERIDIAN, ID

YOU MAY NOT KNOW WHEN YOU SHOULD SEE A KNEE SURGEON, SO HERE ARE SOME HINTS:

YOU MAY NOT KNOW WHEN YOU SHOULD SEE A KNEE SURGEON, SO HERE ARE SOME HINTS:

If you have mechanical symptoms such as popping, locking, or catching

If you have swelling or fluid in your knee

If you have a hard time putting weight on your knee without significant pain

If the pain is not improving with rest, ice, anti-inflammatories and elevation

If you have instability in your knee

If your knee or kneecap suffered a dislocation, even if it popped back into place on its own

MINIMALLY INVASIVE KNEE REPLACEMENT SURGERY

MINIMALLY INVASIVE KNEE REPLACEMENT SURGERY

At Blackrock Orthopedics, we understand that knee replacement surgery can seem intimidating for patients. That’s why we want to make the process as easy and minimally invasive as possible. For example, our surgeries are usually outpatient procedures, meaning you do not have to have to stay overnight for extensive recovery.

If you need knee replacement surgery in Meridian, ID, and want the least recovery times possible, Blackrock Orthopedics can help. We use cutting edge medical technology with doctor managed robotics, that help reduce errors and lessens recovery time. We want to help you return to walking, hiking, biking, playing and doing all your other daily activities pain-free.

Read on to learn about the signs that indicate you might need knee replacement surgery. You can also see a number of our knee surgery options and learn about the conditions that we can help treat. We look forward to helping you find relief from your knee pain.

HERE IS WHAT WE TREAT, AND HOW

You may not know what is causing your knee pain. Let’s meet and get a diagnosis first, then we can plan your treatment options. Here is information on knee conditions we treat and surgeries we offer.

Click any issue for more detail, and our approach to resolving it for you.

KNEE SURGERIES

The ACL is a key stabilizer of the knee. A complete tear will not heal on its own, so it needs to be reconstructed by replacing the torn ligament with a graft from another location. A “less vital” tendon may be harvested from another part of your body (autograft) or a cadaver (allograft) to reconstruct your ACL through bone tunnels in your tibia and femur. Autografts are preferred if possible. Rehab is crucial with these, and can take 9-12 months for appropriate strengthening prior to return to competitive sports.

Cartilage injuries can occur for virtually any reason, but usually in young athletes who routinely stress the knee. Ignoring treatment for too long can cause permanent knee damage. Treatment options differ based on both the patient and severity. Non-surgical treatments vary, while surgical options may include arthroscopy to remove broken pieces of cartilage floating in the knee joint and to smooth out the cartilage with a shaver. Other surgical treatments may include microfracture, OATS (Osteochondral Autologous or allogeneic Transplantation), autologous chondrocyte implantation, or partial knee replacement.

Advanced techniques in knee arthroscopy are utilized at Blackrock Orthopedics. Arthroscopy is used to surgically treat many conditions and injuries within the knee including repairing or cleaning/trimming meniscus tears, cartilage injuries, ACL and PCL injuries and numerous other knee issues.

Sometimes the leg may be “bow legged” or “knock kneed” (Varus or Valgus) alignment. If appropriate a tibial or femoral osteotomy is surgically performed. This means cutting the bone in a strategic and planned way, then fixing the bone in a straight alignment to improve the mechanics and forces through your knee.

Knee replacements (also known as total knee arthroplasty, total knee replacement, knee resurfacing, or TKA) are usually performed for arthritis of the knee, which is when the cartilage wears out. You may hear the term “bone on bone arthritis”, the classic reason for a knee replacement. Knee replacements are among the most successful orthopedic surgeries, and Dr. Winegar performs hundreds every year. He utilizes robotics and computer navigation technology to significantly increase accuracy and precision in both total and partial knee replacements. This doesn’t just boost temporary success, but longevity as well.

The procedure involves replacing a partial or total knee implant with a new implant. Due to the precision required, and the multi-step process, a skilled surgeon with many years of experience is a must. Fortunately, this has long been one of Dr. Winegar’s specialties. Patients can expect a smooth procedure, recovery, and a long-lasting new implant.

The MCL (medial collateral ligament) is often torn during a trauma where the knee is forced inward, causing pain on the medial side of the knee. If the MCL is completely torn it will likely need surgery to repair it back to the femur or tibia to stabilize the knee. If not repaired correctly, the knee could continue to be unstable, cause pain and even future arthritis. Dr. Winegar performs this type of surgery on an outpatient basis. Six weeks with a brace is standard, so the healing ligament can be protected.

Meniscus tears are common after a twisting injury or may be degenerative from wear and tear. They can cause significant pain, mechanical symptoms and can sometimes flip up into the joint causing a block in motion. They rarely heal on their own, and if not treated appropriately they can enlarge or further degrade the joint. Dr. Winegar performs these surgeries as outpatient procedures. They typically take 30 to 60 minutes based on severity. Depending on the MRI and what the tear looks like during arthroscopy, the tear may be repaired or trimmed. Patients may be on crutches from 1-6 weeks after surgery depending on if a repair is required, or if there are other associated injuries.

A very successful procedure, these are ideal when the knee has arthritis localized to only one part. Even though a total knee replacement has tremendous success, patients generally have greater satisfaction, functional scores and a quicker recovery with this option compared to a total knee replacement.

Trauma to the kneecap can cause fracture or a broken kneecap. X-rays will determine whether the fracture will need to be fixed surgically with hardware.

Tendons around the kneecap can tear spontaneously or during a traumatic event. These usually need a heavy suture surgery to fix the tendon back to the kneecap. Dr. Winegar specializes in these types of injuries around and within the knee.

The kneecap (patella) may dislocate due to trauma, hyperlaxity of ligaments, or congenital differences and alignment of the bones. When it dislocates, the stabilizing ligament (MPFL, or medial patellofemoral ligament) tears almost 100% of the time. This is the main soft tissue stabilizer of the knee cap. Every time the kneecap dislocates there is the possibility of cartilage damage within the knee, which can lead to arthritis. To prevent further dislocation and damage to the knee, the MPFL is reconstructed to stabilize the knee cap. Sometimes the bone alignment must also be fixed by cutting and straightening, a procedure called a tibial tubercle osteotomy and realignment.

KNEE CONDITIONS WE TREAT

ACL and PCL tears can come with any traumatic event, but are common in sports like basketball, soccer, or volleyball where a twist and loading force occur on the knee. These typically require surgery, but not always. Let’s discuss options that fit your goals and symptoms.

Cartilage injuries can occur for virtually any reason, but usually in young athletes who routinely stress the knee. Ignoring treatment for too long can cause permanent knee damage. Treatment options differ based on both the patient and severity. Non-surgical treatments vary, while surgical options may include arthroscopy to remove broken pieces of cartilage floating in the knee joint and to smooth out the cartilage with a shaver. Other surgical treatments may include microfracture, OATS (Osteochondral Autologous or allogeneic Transplantation), autologous chondrocyte implantation, or partial knee replacement.

Knee arthritis is when the cartilage on the end of the bones in the joint wear out or are in the process of wearing out. Together, we can discuss the many surgical or non-surgical treatments: therapy, strengthening your legs, weight loss, injections and more. Sometimes surgery may be the best answer, and those are very specific to each individual. Options may be arthroscopy, cartilage restoration surgery, OATS procedures, or even joint replacement or resurfacing options.

Knee deformities may mean abnormal shape or alignment, due to an injury or fracture that hasn’t healed correctly. They may also be caused by slow progression of conditions like arthritis, or just general wear and tear of the knee joint. Surgery can prevent progress of the deformity, and possibly alleviate pain. Sometimes a knee replacement or tibia/femur osteotomy is needed to make the knee straight again. We can evaluate your knee with x-rays, and work with you to plan the ideal treatment.

You may have knee pain from an injury or something that has been going on for a long time. We’ll see you and discuss your pain and the story around the knee issue. We will perform X-rays and do a physical exam. Sometimes we may need to order additional studies such as lab work, or advanced imaging like an MRI. We will use all of this information to diagnose why you are experiencing pain. We will talk together to make the best plan that works for you, whether it is surgical or non-surgical.

MCL injuries are common and can cause prolonged pain on the inside of the knee if not treated appropriately. A partial tear can usually be treated without surgery and heal in 4-6 weeks, while full tears usually need surgery.

Meniscus tears may be from injury or wear and tear and can cause pain and swelling, or mechanical symptoms like locking or popping. Many times they need surgery to heal, but we can discuss your preferred options.

Patella (knee cap) injuries can include fractures, dislocations, or tendon issues like tears or tendonitis. It’s very important to thoroughly and quickly evaluate these injuries to ensure the best treatment is taken.

Rarely does patella tendonitis need surgery and the first line treatment includes activity modification, physical therapy, anti-inflammatories, and ice. If it is severe and persists despite diligent non-surgical treatment, there are options to treat with surgery.

Sports-related injuries are an unfortunate part of something most of us love.

But we are here to get you back playing. Options may be non-surgical and require bracing, physical therapy or strengthening. Our goal is your long-term knee health, not quick-fix shortcuts, whether in surgery or not.

Tendonitis or bursitis occurs when tissue around the knee is inflamed. Usually these issues can be treated with rest, anti-inflammatories, physical therapy & select exercises, temporary activity modifications or injections. Rarely do they need surgery, but if they do we will work with you to determine the best course of action.

Tendon or ligament injuries such as patella tendon, quad tendon, ACL, PCL, MCL, LCL and others usually need an MRI to be evaluated. An exam with imaging will help guide the best treatment options. Injury severity will dictate whether surgery is the best route.